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Bachelor Theses

Theses

Bachelor Theses

Due to flexibility, Bachelor's theses can be written on almost every project in our department.

Bachelor Projects Comparative Psychology 2020/21

Economic decision making of animal and human consumers

We buy things every day and our consuming behavior is often influenced by the price of commodities, as well as our budget for shipping. In this study, we aim to understand how the price and budget will influence the consuming behavior on both animal and human subjects. Further investigations on the underlying neural mechanism will be conducted by animal electrophysiological recordings and human imaging methods. [Animal part]: students will assist in running the experiment, including animal handling and behavioral training. Daily availability required. [Human part]: students will conduct the behavioral experiment on human subjects, or assist in collecting human imaging data. German skills required.

Supervisor: Dr. Yue Hu

Teamwork possible: 2 students

Language: English

 

Decision making in social contexts

Rat communication is a very motivating topic for me, indeed I am going to analyze the ultrasonic vocalization of rats in different contexts to find out the behavioral significance of these calls regarding their characteristic acoustic parameters. Moreover I would like to observe the cell activity of brain's  certain regions through electrophysical methods during behavioral tasks to find out more details about the neural underpinning of rats certain behavior. 

Supervisor: Dooman Seidisarouei

Language: English

 

Social preferences in a transgenic rat model for schizophrenia

The student will work with a novel transgenic rat model for schizophrenia. Recent genetic studies have linked mental illnesses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder to alterations in disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), a multifunctional scaffolding protein.  DISC1 encodes a cytoplasmic protein with many potential interaction partners, but its cellular functions remain poorly understood. One line of evidence links the DISC1 protein to the subcortical dopamine (DA) system, which is heavily implicated in psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia as well. DA plays a crucial role in value based decision making through the generation of prediction errors to unexpected events. In this research project, social preferences in a range of social decision making tasks will be tested on a cohort of rats with a DISC1 mutation and wildtype controls. 

The student(s) will perform established social preference/social decision making tests in the lab using the transgenic DISC1 rats and littermate controls. Student(s) will be trained in animal handling and care, and will learn to perform the daily experiments independantly. Offline data analysis concerns video tracking of animals, behavioral observations and analysis of ultrasonic communications. No programming skills required. Possibility to learn Matlab/Python and R. 

Supervisor: Dooman Seidisarouei, MSc.

Teamwork: is possible

Duration: 6 months

 

Pharmacology of conformity in rats

Social conformity refers to a modification of own behavior to match to others behavior, which could also be found in animals. There is growing evidence in the literature that the neurotransmitter serotonin or hormones like oxytocin or vasopressin influence social behavior. The planned study will investigate whether social conformity could be regulated by locally manipulating these systems. 

This project will involve animal handling and training animals on behavioral tasks. Daily availability (3hrs per weekday minimum) required. 

Supervisor: Dr. Sandra Schäble

teamwork possible: max. 2 students

Language: German or English

 

Appetitive and aversive discounting in rats

Humans have been shown to defer punishments and costs into the future, suggesting that future punishments are discounted relative to immediate punishments. There is only inconclusive evidence to which extent animals accelerate or defer aversive future events. We have conducted a pilot study     to test animals future discounting of aversive events. As a next step we want to investigate if intertemporal decisions involving aversive events are modulated by serotonergic action since the serotonergic system is discussed to be implicated in aversive processing.

This project will involve animal handling and training animals on behavioral tasks. Daily availability (3-4 hrs per weekday minimum) required. 

Supervisor: Dr. Sandra Schäble

teamwork possible: max. 2 students

Language: German or English

 

 

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